Public Notices

Submersible pumps banned on Tulsa District lakes

Published Feb. 16, 2011

TULSA – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Tulsa District, has issued a policy banning the use of submersible pumps for the purpose of withdrawing water for individual domestic use at district lakes.  “Public safety is our top priority,” said Col. Michael Teague, commander.  “Our employees fight the safety battle daily, and this is one change than can save lives.”

Tulsa District will no longer grant waterline licenses to individuals who use submersible pumps to withdraw water from Tulsa District projects.  Current waterline license holders are being notified of the revised policy by personal letter, and are being instructed to remove all pumps and electrical components from federal property. 

The ban was deemed necessary when it was discovered that pumps currently in place are not designed for use in open water, and electric shock can lead to serious injury or death.  This ban is based on a review performed by Corps personnel when it was determined that Underwriters Laboratories has not conducted testing for the placement and use of submersible pumps in marine environments where swimmers and waders may be present.  Manuals for commonly used submersible pumps were reviewed, and each specified that the units were not designed or tested for use in open water. 

Fort Worth and Little Rock Districts are also implementing similar policies.  All three district teams gave careful consideration to public safety as well as customers’ needs while making this decision.   

Licenses may still be issued to individuals who use centrifugal pumps to withdraw lake water if they have approval from the appropriate state water management agency and meet one of the following conditions:

    a.  The pump’s electrical service, including the motor, connections and terminations, are located above the top of the flood control pool elevation of the lake.

    b.  The pump is mounted on the deck of a privately-owned boat dock which has been permitted under the shoreline management program, and the pump installation has been certified by a licensed electrical contractor.

The Tulsa District manages 38 lakes in Oklahoma and parts of Kansas and Texas.


Release no. 11-019

ArticleCS

Submersible pumps banned on Tulsa District lakes

Published Feb. 16, 2011

TULSA – The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, Tulsa District, has issued a policy banning the use of submersible pumps for the purpose of withdrawing water for individual domestic use at district lakes.  “Public safety is our top priority,” said Col. Michael Teague, commander.  “Our employees fight the safety battle daily, and this is one change than can save lives.”

Tulsa District will no longer grant waterline licenses to individuals who use submersible pumps to withdraw water from Tulsa District projects.  Current waterline license holders are being notified of the revised policy by personal letter, and are being instructed to remove all pumps and electrical components from federal property. 

The ban was deemed necessary when it was discovered that pumps currently in place are not designed for use in open water, and electric shock can lead to serious injury or death.  This ban is based on a review performed by Corps personnel when it was determined that Underwriters Laboratories has not conducted testing for the placement and use of submersible pumps in marine environments where swimmers and waders may be present.  Manuals for commonly used submersible pumps were reviewed, and each specified that the units were not designed or tested for use in open water. 

Fort Worth and Little Rock Districts are also implementing similar policies.  All three district teams gave careful consideration to public safety as well as customers’ needs while making this decision.   

Licenses may still be issued to individuals who use centrifugal pumps to withdraw lake water if they have approval from the appropriate state water management agency and meet one of the following conditions:

    a.  The pump’s electrical service, including the motor, connections and terminations, are located above the top of the flood control pool elevation of the lake.

    b.  The pump is mounted on the deck of a privately-owned boat dock which has been permitted under the shoreline management program, and the pump installation has been certified by a licensed electrical contractor.

The Tulsa District manages 38 lakes in Oklahoma and parts of Kansas and Texas.


Release no. 11-019