US Army Corps of Engineers
Tulsa District Website

Tulsa News from DVIDS

  1. Council Grove Lake environmental assessment, draft master plan available for public comment

    The Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will accept written public comments related to the management of Council Grove Lake April 9 - May 9. Draft documents for the Council Grove Lake Master Plan and Council Grove Lake Environmental Assessment as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact letter will be available online at https://www.swt.usace.army.mil/Missions/Recreation/Master-Plans. Comments received after May 9 will not be considered. Questions can be directed to the lake manager.
    4/6/2021
  2. Marion Reservoir environmental assessment, draft master plan available for public comment

    The Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will accept written public comments related to the management of Marion Reservoir April 9 - May 9. Draft documents for the Marion Reservoir Master Plan and Marion Reservoir Environmental Assessment as well as the Finding of No Significant Impact letter will be available online at https://www.swt.usace.army.mil/Missions/Recreation/Master-Plans.
    4/6/2021
  3. Blue Green Algae

    An educational video regarding Blue Green Algae and it's impacts on lakes and humans and how the Corps of Engineers in Tulsa, Oklahoma responds to outbreaks.
    3/23/2021
  4. State Highway 151A over Keystone Dam to close

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will close the State Highway 151A bridge over Keystone Dam, March 30 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., to repair a hatch cover and minor concrete damage caused by the February winter storm.
    3/23/2021
  5. HWY 151A over Keystone Dam to close for maintenance

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will close the State Highway 151A bridge over Keystone Dam, March 30 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., to repair a hatch cover and minor concrete damage caused by the February winter storm. Both the northeast and southeast lanes will be closed to traffic. Commuters who regularly use the roadway should seek alternative routes. The Keystone Dam maintenance staff has coordinated the closure with the Oklahoma Department of Transportation. The repair work will not impact water release or powerhouse Operations at Keystone Dam.
    3/23/2021
  6. State Highway 151A over Keystone Dam to close temporarilly

    The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will close the State Highway 151A bridge over Keystone Dam, March 30 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., to repair a hatch cover and minor concrete damage caused by the February winter storm.
    3/23/2021
  7. TULSA DISTRICT OPERATIONS DIVISION HOSTS CULTURAL RESOURCES TRAINING

    To ensure park rangers know how to identify those resource and properly address issues related to cultural resources and artifacts, Operations Division recently hosted a Cultural Resources Identification Ranger Training Class.
    3/19/2021
  8. Tulsa District Operations Division hosts cultural rsources identification training

    To ensure park rangers know how to identify those resource and properly address issues related to cultural resources and artifacts, Operations Division recently hosted a Cultural Resources Identification Ranger Training Class. The Tulsa District alone has more than 5500 recorded archaeological sites Shingleton noted, and most federal lands have not been completely surveyed. Because of the preponderance of cultural resources and culturally significant sites it’s important that employees and visitors exercise good judgment on USACE property.
    3/19/2021
  9. Tulsa District Operations Division hosts cultural resources training

    Ken Shingleton, Natural Resources Lead, Tulsa District hosted a Cultural Resources Identification Ranger Training Class, March 16. Shingleton oversees the Tulsa District's archaeologists and monitors cultural and historical program compliance.
    3/19/2021
  10. Dam Safety Production Center oversees Keystone Dam maintenance project

    A project delivery team from the Keystone Dam Safety Production Center, a Southwestern Division asset, located at the Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is overseeing maintenance to repair damages from the 2019 Flood in Oklahoma.
    3/19/2021
  11. Forward Engineer Support Team rounds out training exercise with real-world contingency operation response

    CAMP GRUBER, Okla. – Members of the 59th Forward Engineering Support Team – Advance (FEST-A) gathered here to exercise their emergency response capabilities and complete required certification training.
    3/18/2021
  12. 59th Forward Engineer Support Team - Advance [Image 3 of 3]

    Members of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 59th Forward Engineer Support Team – Advance, collaborate on developing site assessments and statements-of-work during their certification exercise on Camp Gruber, Okla., Feb 18, 2021. Both members later deployed with the team as part of a contingency operations mission to Ft. Sill, Okla., in response to a real-world severe weather emergency.
    3/18/2021
  13. 59th Forward Engineer Support Team - Advance [Image 2 of 3]

    USACE, Tulsa District Commander, Scott S. Preston, presents a commander’s coin to Miranda Ryan, an environmental scientist with the Norfolk District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, who joined the 59th Forward Engineering Support Team (FEST-A) because she wanted to try something different and experience a professional challenge outside of her normal comfort zone. Ryan took part in the FEST-A certification exercise on Camp Gruber, Okla., and later deployed with the team as part of a real-world contingency operations mission at Ft. Sill, Okla., in response to a severe weather emergency.
    3/18/2021
  14. 59th Forward Engineer Support Team - Advance [Image 1 of 3]

    USACE, Tulsa District Commander, Scott S. Preston (left) meets with members of the 59th Forward Engineering Support Team – Advanced (FEST-A), at Camp Gruber, Okla., Feb. 18, 2021, to observe their certification field exercise, review team members’ assessment briefings and offer words of advice and encouragement. The 59th FEST-A is a part of the USACE - Field Force Engineering program. This small, advance engineering team rapidly deploys worldwide and provides technical engineer support, conducts critical infrastructure surveys, engineer reconnaissance operations, base camp planning, geospatial operations, as well as construction planning, design and management capabilities.
    3/18/2021
  15. Tulsa District trains personnel on prescribed burn

    The Fort Gibson Project office hosted a training class March 1-5, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for conducting prescribed fire on government lands.
    3/15/2021
  16. Tulsa District conducts prescribed fire training [Image 10 of 10]

    The Fort Gibson Project office hosted a training class March 1-5, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for conducting prescribed fire on government lands. Fifteen USACE park rangers and maintenance staff from seven USACE Civil works Projects attended the training. As part of the training the class conducted eight prescribed burns over three days, burning a total of 1,485 acres of USACE and Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation managed lands. The five-day training session included instruction in safety, fire, laws, smoke management, field preparation, planning, fire effects, fire behavior, ignition devices, ignition techniques, execution of fire plans, fire weather, fire and wildland/interface, fire ecology and effects on wildlife, as well as a final written test. (U.S. Army photo by Preston L. Chasteen)
    3/15/2021
  17. Tulsa District conducts prescribed fire training [Image 9 of 10]

    Natural Resource Specialist Ashley Novar from the Keystone Lake Office operates a drip torch during prescribed burn training. The Fort Gibson Project office hosted a training class March 1-5, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for conducting prescribed fire on government lands. Fifteen USACE park rangers and maintenance staff from seven USACE Civil works Projects attended the training. As part of the training the class conducted eight prescribed burns over three days, burning a total of 1,485 acres of USACE and Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation managed lands. The five-day training session included instruction in safety, fire, laws, smoke management, field preparation, planning, fire effects, fire behavior, ignition devices, ignition techniques, execution of fire plans, fire weather, fire and wildland/interface, fire ecology and effects on wildlife, as well as a final written test. (U.S. Army photo by Preston L. Chasteen)
    3/15/2021
  18. Tulsa District conducts prescribed fire training [Image 8 of 10]

    Natural Resource Specialist Bridger Montgomery from the Eufaula Lake Office uses a drip torch during prescribed burn training. The Fort Gibson Project office hosted a training class March 1-5, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for conducting prescribed fire on government lands. Fifteen USACE park rangers and maintenance staff from seven USACE Civil works Projects attended the training. As part of the training the class conducted eight prescribed burns over three days, burning a total of 1,485 acres of USACE and Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation managed lands. The five-day training session included instruction in safety, fire, laws, smoke management, field preparation, planning, fire effects, fire behavior, ignition devices, ignition techniques, execution of fire plans, fire weather, fire and wildland/interface, fire ecology and effects on wildlife, as well as a final written test. (U.S. Army photo by Preston L. Chasteen)
    3/15/2021
  19. Tulsa District conducts prescribed fire training [Image 7 of 10]

    Mr. John Weir (center) of the Department of Natural Resource Ecology and Management at Oklahoma State University along with U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Biologists Stacy Dunkin (left) and Jason Person evaluate weather conditions prior to beginning a prescribed burn. The Fort Gibson Project office hosted a training class March 1-5, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for conducting prescribed burns on government lands. Fifteen USACE park rangers and maintenance staff from seven USACE Civil works Projects attended the training. As part of the training the class conducted eight prescribed burns over three days, burning a total of 1,485 acres of USACE and Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation managed lands. The five-day training session included instruction in safety, fire, laws, smoke management, field preparation, planning, fire effects, fire behavior, ignition devices, ignition techniques, execution of fire plans, fire weather, fire and wildland/interface, fire ecology and effects on wildlife, as well as a final written test. (U.S. Army photo by Preston L. Chasteen)
    3/15/2021
  20. Tulsa District conducts prescribed fire training [Image 6 of 10]

    Tulsa District Natural Resource Specialists survey a burned area following a prescribed burn. The Fort Gibson Project office hosted a training class March 1-5, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for conducting prescribed fire on government lands. Fifteen USACE park rangers and maintenance staff from seven USACE Civil works Projects attended the training. As part of the training the class conducted eight prescribed burns over three days, burning a total of 1,485 acres of USACE and Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation managed lands. The five-day training session included instruction in safety, fire, laws, smoke management, field preparation, planning, fire effects, fire behavior, ignition devices, ignition techniques, execution of fire plans, fire weather, fire and wildland/interface, fire ecology and effects on wildlife, as well as a final written test. (U.S. Army photo by Preston L. Chasteen)
    3/15/2021
  21. Tulsa District conducts prescribed fire training [Image 5 of 10]

    The Fort Gibson Project office hosted a training class March 1-5, in partial fulfillment of the requirements for conducting prescribed fire on government lands. Fifteen USACE park rangers and maintenance staff from seven USACE Civil works Projects attended the training. As part of the training the class conducted eight prescribed burns over three days, burning a total of 1,485 acres of USACE and Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation managed lands. The five-day training session included instruction in safety, fire, laws, smoke management, field preparation, planning, fire effects, fire behavior, ignition devices, ignition techniques, execution of fire plans, fire weather, fire and wildland/interface, fire ecology and effects on wildlife, as well as a final written test. (U.S. Army photo by Preston L. Chasteen)
    3/15/2021
  22. Dam Safety Production Center leads Keystone maintenance project

    The Dam Safety Production Center is overseeing a maintenance project at Keystone Dam. The project will allow engineers to better quantify and analyze groundwater seepage during future flood events. Included in the project are demolition and repaving of the powerhouse parking lot, erosion repair on left and right abutments of the dam, repair to the fishing area below the dam, security fencing and lighting.
    3/12/2021
  23. Oh! We’re halfway there

    Repairs to the bridge over Eufaula Dam are nearly half complete. The cooperative project between the Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and the Oklahoma Department of Transportation resulted in closure of Oklahoma Highway 71.
    3/11/2021
  24. Tulsa District personnel work with multi district FEST-A team at Fort Sill

    In a joint effort to identify storm damage at Fort Sill, Tulsa District Corps of Engineers staff based at Fort Sill and Forward Engineering Support Team-Advance are assessing critical structures at the base.
    3/5/2021
  25. ‘Honoring the past, securing the future’ Tulsa District hosts virtual Black History Day celebration

    Tulsa District hosted a special emphasis program for Black History month, Feb. 25. The program's theme was 'Honoring the past - securing the future'. The program emphasized the success of Tulsa's "Black Wall Street" and covered the "Tulsa Race Massacre" of May 31, 1921.
    2/26/2021
  26. Employee Spotlight: Alan Williams

    Alan Williams is the Executive Assistant to the Commander, Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers. As the EA, Alan coordinates schedules and appointments and ensures the commander remains on track to accomplish his vision for the Tulsa District. Alan also serves in the 138th Fighter Wing, as a Religious Affairs Airmen in the Oklahoma Air National Guard. Alan grew up in Broken Arrow, Oklahoma and is a graduate of Broken Arrow High School.
    2/3/2021
  27. Tulsa District Snapshot

    A quick video glimpse at some of the missions performed by the Tulsa District U.S. Army Corps of Engineers
    12/15/2020
  28. Tulsa District generator rotor removal

    In this time-lapse video, our engineers and expert technicians at the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tulsa District Keystone Powerhouse recently removed a 179 ton rotor from one of the units to perform needed repairs. Tulsa District operates eight hydropower facilities in the region. These plants benefit approximately 2 million end users throughout Oklahoma, Texas, Arkansas, Missouri, Kansas and Louisiana.
    12/15/2020
  29. New mechanical systems to help trout fishery below Tenkiller Dam

    The stream below Tenkiller Dam in Okla. is home to a popular trout fishery; however, during the 2011 drought, low dissolved oxygen levels, and high water temperatures resulted in a fish kill of both trout and other types of fish. As a result of a multi-agency effort, a two-part mechanical solution was developed to prevent further fish kills below the dam.
    6/26/2013
  • Corps seeks public comment for Lake Texoma Shoreline Management Plan revision

    The 30-day public comment period for the review of the draft Lake Texoma Shoreline Management Plan revision begins Dec. 2 and will conclude Jan. 2. The Tulsa District is providing a virtual public involvement presentation to promote public education and input related to the draft Lake Texoma SMP. Virtual presentations are available at https://www.swt.usace.army.mil/Locations/Tulsa-District-Lakes/Oklahoma/Lake-Texoma/. Links to the draft shoreline management plan, finding of no significant impact letter, public comment forms and shoreline management presentations, are available on the Tulsa District website at https://www.swt.usace.army.mil/Missions/Recreation/Shoreline-Management-Plans/. The Shoreline Management Plan addresses the rules and guidelines that govern private shoreline uses, such as private boat docks, vegetation modification, and similar uses of USACE federally owned fee property.
  • Corps finds ‘no significant impact’ for Lake Texoma revised shoreline management plan

    According to the Tulsa District’s “Finding of no significant impact” letter, available on the Tulsa District website and in the USACE Headquarters Library. - The FONSI letter is located at the USACE Headquarters Library at https://usace.contentdm.oclc.org/digital/collection/p16021coll7/id/16497 - No compensatory mitigation is required - Final draft environmental assessment and FONSI will be complete by January 2, 2021 - The SMP revision will have no effect on species listed in the Endangered Species Act of 1973 - All relevant environmental laws have been considered and agency coordination is complete - According to the FONSI letter, public review of the draft SMP, environmental assessment, and FONSI will be completed by January 2, 2021
  • Public Notice RepCorrection: After action environmental assessment for the Webbers pool and Robert S. Kerr pool emergency dredging and placement

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EREbPV7YqZs&feature=youtu.be Information included in the below public notice, which was published Aug 28, included a presentation with incorrect information. The information is in the summary of the article. The video of the presentation was updated and provides corrected information. The public notice remains the same. The Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, is soliciting comments from the public and agencies on the potential effects of the emergency dredging and placement of dredged spoils activity that occurred during the spring and summer of 2019, as well as, the effects of the water drawdown, impact to the mussel population that was affected as a result of the drawdown, and mitigation efforts, on the Arkansas River, southeast of Tulsa, Oklahoma.  The Corps has initiated an after action Environmental Assessment (EA) for this activity that occurred in the Webbers Pool and Robert S. Kerr Pool in Oklahoma.  The EA for this after action is authorized in Section 216 of the River and Harbor Flood Control Act of 1970 and Section 1202 of the Water Infrastructure Improvements for the Nation Act of 2016.  The EA will assess how the action affected the human environment and to make the determination if the action was compliant with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA).  Your comments will help the Corps in development of this EA. In May and June 2019 record rainfall fell in Southeastern Kansas and Northeastern Oklahoma which caused widespread flooding in the region.  Approximately 15 Corps of Engineers reservoirs in the Upper Arkansas River Basin, Verdigris River Basin, and Grand (Neosho) River Basin, all within Tulsa District, flood pools were flooded to the top of their capacity.  With so many reservoirs at the top of their flood pool capacity, the Tulsa District managed reservoir releases so there was a balanced approach to evacuating flood waters from all pools.  Unfortunately, significant and in some cases, catastrophic flooding was unavoidable due to the received rainfall.  River flows, measured in cubic feet per second (CFS), were overwhelming within large portions of the river system.  Below Keystone Dam just west of Tulsa, the rate of river flow approached 300,000 CFS at its maximum volume and was flowing at 600,000 CFS at W.D. Mayo Dam Lock and Dam 14. The McLellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System (MKARNS) just downstream from the Arkansas River confluence with the Verdigris River and the Grand (Neosho) River had a sustained volume of well over 600,000 CFS over a duration of more than a week.  This increased river flow was carrying an enormous volume of sediment which was transported from the three upstream feeder river basins and was passed through upstream dams and into the Navigation System, where much of it was subsequently deposited.  Result of this increased sedimentation was 3 miles of river channel was clogged with an estimated 1,000,000 cubic yards of sediment.  This material had to be removed before the Navigation System could be reopened for navigable traffic and interstate commerce.  Therefore, the Tulsa District made the decision to commence dredging and dredge spoil operations prior to NEPA review so economic impacts to the region would be reduced. There was another complicating factor other than three miles of river channel being clogged with sedimentation.  On May 23, 2019 two fully-loaded barges moored in the Muskogee area tore loose and were carried downstream, where they collided with the dam at Webbers Falls and sunk.  The barges were forced against three of the structure's open gates.  The two sunken barges impeded the operation of the gates and those gates could not be closed, resulting in the drawdown of the pools and subsequent negative impacts to mussel populations.  Removal of these barges was dependent on the emergency dredging action, specifically the portion within the Robert S. Kerr pool.  The salvage crew hired for this task utilized a tow barge which the only feasible means of travel was up the McLellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System to the Webber Falls Lock and Dam. Pursuant to Section 102 of the NEPA as implemented by the regulations promulgated by the Council on Environmental Quality (40 Code of Federal Regulations Parts 1500-1508 and U.S. Army Corps of Engineers’ Engineering Regulation 200-2-2), an Environmental Assessment will be conducted to ensure compliance with the NEPA and appropriate environmental laws, regulations, agency policies and guidance, and executive orders, and to provide any necessary mitigation as a result of impacts from the emergency dredging, discharge of dredged material, and draw down of the pool.  Our office would like to solicit any input you may have with respect to this after action environmental assessment for the Webbers Pool and Robert S. Kerr Pool Emergency Dredging and Placement to assist us as we progress through the NEPA process.  A brief presentation regarding this action is available starting on August 20, 2020, on the Tulsa District website:  www.swt.usace.army.mil.   We look forward to receiving your written comments, which are due by September 20, 2020.  Please contact Mr. Jeff Knack, Chief, Natural Resources and Recreation Branch, Tulsa District, by mail U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, 2488 E 81st Street, Tulsa, Oklahoma  74137-4290, email at jeff.knack@usace.army.mil, or telephone at (918) 669-7660 with comments, questions, or the need for further information.
  • After action environmental assessment for the Webbers pool and Robert S. Kerr pool emergency dredging and placement

    Corps is submitting public notice of after action environmental assessment related to potential effects of dredging on the McClellan-Kerr Arkansas River Navigation System. A video presentation detailing specifics related to the Environmental Assessment is available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EREbPV7YqZs&feature=youtu.be Comments will be accepted through September 20, 2020. Comment forms are available at www.swt.usace.army.mil
  • Enid Kaw Lake Water Supply Public Notice

    City of Enid is proposing to provide alternate water supply from Kaw Lake a USACE project near Ponca City in Kay and Osage Counties, Oklahoma Components of the proposed project including access roads, intake and pump station, and a pipeline, would lie within the Kaw Lake Project boundaries. As such, the City is requesting 33 U.S.C Section 408 approval from USACE-SWT to occupy and alter portions of the Kaw Lake Project to accomplish the proposed project. Proposed alterations and modifications related to the proposed project are operation and maintenance responsibilities of the non-federal sponsor, the City of Enid, and would be implemented at no cost to the federal government The purpose of a 33 USC 408 (Section 408) review [as described in EC 1165-2-220] is to ensure that the Congressionally-authorized benefits of a USACE project are not undermined or impaired by an alteration made by others, and to ensure the alteration is not injurious to the public interest.
  • Edmond Arcadia Lake WTP Expansion

    Edmond Arcadia Lake WTP Expansion
  • Tulsa West Tulsa Levee Feasibility Study

    Tulsa West Tulsa Levee Feasibility Study State and Agency Review Documents