US Army Corps of Engineers
Tulsa District

‘Success always leaves footprints’ theme for African American Heritage program

Published Feb. 15, 2017
Linda Ware Toure, a retired educator with more than 38 years of teaching and administration service in the Oklahoma City Public School system gave the keynote address for the African American Heritage program at the Tulsa District Office, Feb. 15. The theme for Toure's talk was 'Success always leaves footprints.'

Linda Ware Toure, a retired educator with more than 38 years of teaching and administration service in the Oklahoma City Public School system gave the keynote address for the African American Heritage program at the Tulsa District Office, Feb. 15. The theme for Toure's talk was 'Success always leaves footprints.'

Josephine-Joy Hammond dances during the African American Heritage program at the Tulsa District office, Feb. 15. Hammond, who is a native of Ghana, a nation located in West Africa, performs and teaches praise and contemporary interpretive dance at her church.

Josephine-Joy Hammond dances during the African American Heritage program at the Tulsa District office, Feb. 15. Hammond, who is a native of Ghana, a nation located in West Africa, performs and teaches praise and contemporary interpretive dance at her church.

The Tulsa District, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers hosted its 2017 African American Heritage Month program, at the Tulsa District office, Feb. 15.

Guest speaker, Linda Ware Toure, an educator with more than 38 years of service, was the keynote speaker for the event.
The theme for Toure’s presentation was “Success always leaves footprints”. The retired educator of more than 38 years spoke about the Voting Rights Act of 1965 and the importance of voting with regard to public policy and setting the course of the future of communities and nations.

“Voting is the number one way that all Americans can make a difference,” said Toure. “If you don’t think that voting has consequences, we just need look at what’s happened down through the years.”

The event also featured a contemporary praise dance by Josephine-Joy Hammond, who teaches youth and children’s ministry, contemporary and interpretive praise dance.

Mireille Bompuku, a native of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, catered the program by preparing food samples from the African nation for attendees.